If you are seeing this message, your browser is not able to view Dynamic web pages. The following information would have been shown to you:

Thomas Alva Edison
1847-1931

Thomas Alva Edison set up his first small laboratory in Newark, New Jersey in 1871, where he invented devices to greatly improve the speed and efficiency of the telegraph. He later moved to Menlo Park, NJ, where he built a research and development laboratory, which would later serve as a model for such modern facilities as Bell Laboratories. It was here that Edison invented the first successful incandescent electric light for both commercial and residential usage. After moving to his third laboratory in West Orange, NJ, in 1887, Edison began to work on the phonograph, eventually creating the first motion picture. By the time of his death, Edison had earned patents for more than a thousand inventions. Inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1973, Edison is a cultural icon and symbol of American ingenuity. For more information, please see http://www.nps.gov/edis/index.htm.

Compiled from information provided by Edison National Historic Site.


Paul Leroy Bustill Robeson
1898-1976

One of New Jersey's most influential and controversial figures of the early 20th century is singer, actor, civil rights activist, scholar, athlete and author, Paul Robeson. One of the best known and most widely respected black Americans of the 1930s and 40s, Robeson, who was born and raised in Princeton, NJ, was an internationally-acclaimed stage actor, who starred in such memorable leading roles as Othello (1930 and 1943), The Emperor Jones (1933) and Toussaint L'Ouverture (1936). Robeson, a graduate of Rutgers College (now University) was an early staunch supporter of many controversial causes, including socialism, civil rights, and colonial liberation. In 1998, The New Jersey Historical Society showed the unprecedented exhibition Paul Robeson: Bearer of a Culture, which marked the 100th birthday of the pivotal, but forgotten American cultural figure from New Jersey. This traveling exhibition, comprised of rare photographs, manuscripts, diaries, sculpture, memorabilia, and audio recordings of speeches and songs, was created by the Paul Robeson Foundation.


Abbie Greiger Chevallier
1810-1846

Abbie Greiger was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1810. She married a well-known Newark jeweler Clement Eugene Chevallier in 1833, and the prominent couple ranked among the elite of Newark society during the early 19th Century. Mrs. Chevallier died in 1846 at the age of 36. This portrait, which was donated to The New Jersey Historical Society by Julia C. Alling in 1936, was painted around 1835. Attributed to the painter Oliver T. Eddy, it is an oil painting on wood, one of about 240 pieces of fine art in the museum collection of the Historical Society. Our collection consists of many notable figures of New Jersey's past, including Aaron Burr by artist Gilbert Stuart and Theodore Frelinghuysen (Henry Clay's vice-presidential candidate in 1844) by Rembrandt Peale. Additional portraits include other works by Peale, portraits by Asher B. Durand (founder of the Hudson River School) and Oliver Tarbell (a Newark portraitist whose works are also at the Metropolitan Museum of Art).


Gladys Perez
Gladys Perez was featured in the exhibition Moving Through Memory: Caribbean Folk Arts in New Jersey, which was shown from April 26, 1995 to May 5, 1996. Photographed by Tony Velez in 1994, Gladys Perez combined different adornments to create her own unique look and, in many cases, works of art. In this photograph, some of Perez' elaborate assemblages are seen along her jacket collar and the brim of her hat. Many of the items were gifts for family and friends in her homeland, Cuba. As exhibition curator Isabel Nazario writes in the catalogue that accompanied the exhibition, people like Perez "bring an extraordinary sense of vitality to our understanding of material culture and folk art . . . through objects traditionally regarded as craft and those typically not so viewed, artists across New Jersey are both preserving and transforming the flavor and sensibility of island life." This exhibition focused on the folk art of five Caribbean cultures and their impact on the changing landscape of New Jersey's cities and suburbs. Developed in collaboration with the Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers University, New Brunswick and traveled to Stedman Gallery, Rutgers University, Camden.

--
Back to Home
Who We Are
Visit Us
Explore Our Collections
Do History
For Teachers
Get Involved


--
People in New Jersey History

 

 

Search
JerseyHistory.org 

This Week at NJHS:  

MONTHLY CALENDAR >>



News:

"New Jersey during the Civil War: An American Story" Exhibition

ADMISSION

MUSEUM HOURS
10:00 am to 5:00 pm
Tuesday - Saturday

LIBRARY HOURS
12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Tuesday- Saturday
Please schedule an appointment

 

Current Exhibitions:

Ebb and Flow: New Jersey and Its Rivers
Ebb and Flow investigates the role of 4 New Jersey rivers in the history and development of the state.

 

The New Jersey Historical Society
52 Park Place - Newark, NJ 07102
(973) 596-8500 - Fax: (973) 596-6957
Contact NJHS
Copyright © 2001, The New Jersey Historical Society
Our Privacy Policy - Site Map

 

 

Photograph of Thomas Edison (possibly by William Cone), ca. 1915-1930
Photograph of Paul Robeson (unknown photographer), ca. 1930-1940
Photograph of Gladys Perez. Tony Velez, ca. 1994
"Abbie Greiger Chevallier" attributed to Oliver T. Eddy, 1835. Oil on wood
      Gift of Julia C. Alling. 1936.2

 
--

Click the image for information about: Thomas Alva Edison

Click the image for information about: Paul Leroy Bustill Robeson

Click the image for information about: Abbie Greiger Chevallier

Click the image for information about: Gladys Perez

Thomas Alva Edison
1847-1931

Thomas Alva Edison set up his first small laboratory in Newark, New Jersey in 1871, where he invented devices to greatly improve the speed and efficiency of the telegraph. He later moved to Menlo Park, NJ, where he built a research and development laboratory, which would later serve as a model for such modern facilities as Bell Laboratories. It was here that Edison invented the first successful incandescent electric light for both commercial and residential usage. After moving to his third laboratory in West Orange, NJ, in 1887, Edison began to work on the phonograph, eventually creating the first motion picture. By the time of his death, Edison had earned patents for more than a thousand inventions. Inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1973, Edison is a cultural icon and symbol of American ingenuity. For more information, please see http://www.nps.gov/edis/index.htm.

Compiled from information provided by Edison National Historic Site.

Close Window

Paul Leroy Bustill Robeson
1898-1976

One of New Jersey's most influential and controversial figures of the early 20th century is singer, actor, civil rights activist, scholar, athlete and author, Paul Robeson. One of the best known and most widely respected black Americans of the 1930s and 40s, Robeson, who was born and raised in Princeton, NJ, was an internationally-acclaimed stage actor, who starred in such memorable leading roles as Othello (1930 and 1943), The Emperor Jones (1933) and Toussaint L'Ouverture (1936). Robeson, a graduate of Rutgers College (now University) was an early staunch supporter of many controversial causes, including socialism, civil rights, and colonial liberation. In 1998, The New Jersey Historical Society showed the unprecedented exhibition Paul Robeson: Bearer of a Culture, which marked the 100th birthday of the pivotal, but forgotten American cultural figure from New Jersey. This traveling exhibition, comprised of rare photographs, manuscripts, diaries, sculpture, memorabilia, and audio recordings of speeches and songs, was created by the Paul Robeson Foundation.

Close Window

Abbie Greiger Chevallier
1810-1846

Abbie Greiger was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1810. She married a well-known Newark jeweler Clement Eugene Chevallier in 1833, and the prominent couple ranked among the elite of Newark society during the early 19th Century. Mrs. Chevallier died in 1846 at the age of 36. This portrait, which was donated to The New Jersey Historical Society by Julia C. Alling in 1936, was painted around 1835. Attributed to the painter Oliver T. Eddy, it is an oil painting on wood, one of about 240 pieces of fine art in the museum collection of the Historical Society. Our collection consists of many notable figures of New Jersey's past, including Aaron Burr by artist Gilbert Stuart and Theodore Frelinghuysen (Henry Clay's vice-presidential candidate in 1844) by Rembrandt Peale. Additional portraits include other works by Peale, portraits by Asher B. Durand (founder of the Hudson River School) and Oliver Tarbell (a Newark portraitist whose works are also at the Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Close Window

Gladys Perez
Gladys Perez was featured in the exhibition Moving Through Memory: Caribbean Folk Arts in New Jersey, which was shown from April 26, 1995 to May 5, 1996. Photographed by Tony Velez in 1994, Gladys Perez combined different adornments to create her own unique look and, in many cases, works of art. In this photograph, some of Perez' elaborate assemblages are seen along her jacket collar and the brim of her hat. Many of the items were gifts for family and friends in her homeland, Cuba. As exhibition curator Isabel Nazario writes in the catalogue that accompanied the exhibition, people like Perez "bring an extraordinary sense of vitality to our understanding of material culture and folk art . . . through objects traditionally regarded as craft and those typically not so viewed, artists across New Jersey are both preserving and transforming the flavor and sensibility of island life." This exhibition focused on the folk art of five Caribbean cultures and their impact on the changing landscape of New Jersey's cities and suburbs. Developed in collaboration with the Center for Latino Arts and Culture, Rutgers University, New Brunswick and traveled to Stedman Gallery, Rutgers University, Camden.

Close Window